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Therapist Spotlight: Ann Pham, LGMFT

Friday, October 14th, 2022

Q: On behalf of the Relationship Counseling Center of Maryland (RCC), thank you for being on staff as a therapist! What has been the most exciting part in working with RCC and its clients?

A: Oh, thank you! I am so glad to be at RCC too. One of the most exciting parts has been continuing to meet new and current clients each week. I enjoy working collaboratively with my clients to create and reach their therapy goals. I really enjoy being a therapist and being able to do what I love is so exciting.

Q: In your style of therapy, do you like to tackle the main issue head-on, or focus on the deeper issues first?

A: Sometimes, I think I can help address the main issue first and process through the deeper issues at the same time but I know that’s not feasible. It really depends on the client’s therapy goals and what they are comfortable with sharing initially in session!

Q: Have you yourself been to therapy?

A: Yes! I started attending therapy during my time in graduate school. It helped me manage my stress as a student and I learned a lot about myself.

Q: What was the moment you realized you wanted to be a marriage and family therapist?

A: Growing up, I wished that I could major in “Love” because my friends and I would always share relationship advice with each other. During my senior year in undergrad, I saw a family therapy role-play and I was so intrigued by the therapist I had to learn more about it.

Q: What do you like most about working with people?

A: I really enjoy listening to people’s life stories. I enjoy learning how their experiences and interactions with families have guided them to where they are today.

Q: Outside of being a therapist, what are some of your hobbies?

A: I enjoy visiting new restaurants and trying new cuisines. I also love to visit food markets and support local restaurant owners.

Q: What do you do for self-care?

A: Being consistent with a night-time skin-care routine and practicing yoga has been my favorite way to pamper and de-stress myself!

Q: In your experience, what is the most important thing that can strengthen a relationship?

A: There will be difficulties one or both partners face during the relationship. When there is a willingness to discuss your needs and the ability to reassure your partner through validation and empathy, this can strengthen the relationship in many aspects.

2022-10-18T10:23:11-04:00October 18th, 2022|

Removing Thorns in Your Relationship

by Tamara Hull, LGMFT

Friday, August 26th, 2022

If the joy of a significant relationship can be compared to the timeless beauty of a rose, then those deeply hurtful differences around critical issues could be considered the thorns. In my work, I’ve found that differences around child rearing, caregiving, or threats to the intimate partner relationship can re-open old wounds, creating new “thorns” in a relationship.  Couples often either fight ineffectively about these issues or resort to burying the problem and “moving on.” This can create lasting pain and relationship-deadening disconnection if they aren’t effectively resolved.

The following are suggestions for resolving those persistent “thorny” issues:

  1. Time to Talk:Set aside a time that is conducive to both partners feeling relaxed and focused to discuss the issue together. One option for making this request is: “I know this has been a challenging topic for us, and I’d like for us to set aside a time to talk about (INSERT TOPIC), (i.e. our differences in our disciplinary approaches with the kids), to try to find a way to reduce any negative impacts on our relationship.”2. Reaffirm Solidarity:Although one partner may hold a larger portion of the resentment about the issue, consider that your partner is already aware of the persistent, thorny nature of the concern. This could contribute to expressions of anxiety or defensiveness. I recommend that you help reassure your partner by stating your desire to unite together to fight for the relationship and against the thorns between you, rather than continuing the pattern of fighting against one other.

    3. Speak Well, Listen Well: Acknowledge that your partner has a different perspective and has a different worldview from you. it is helpful to make it a priority to hear and demonstrate your understanding of one other fully before focusing on problem-solving. To honor one other’s differences and keep the lines of communication open, try opening the discussion by using statements beginning with, “When ‘X’ happened, I felt very ‘Y’ and the impact on me/us was ‘Z’.” Afterwards, allow your partner to comment and reflect back to them what you heard them say before responding.  Take turns speaking and listening until each partner feels heard.

    It helps to be patient and compassionate with yourself and with your partner.  It may take several gentle and committed conversations over time to see a successful resolution.  Keep in mind that “agreeing to disagree” is an acceptable option. If you get stuck at any point, consider seeking assistance from a trusted source who is experienced and/or skilled in helping partners resolve tough conflicts in ways that strengthen and grow the relationship.  With patient persistence and an approach that reduces attacking and blaming, you and your partner can begin to resolve thorny issues and restore the lasting beauty, joy and intimacy of your relationship.

2022-08-31T11:10:03-04:00August 26th, 2022|

Co-Parenting on the Same Team

by Wilson A. Llerena, LCMFT

Friday, July 29th, 2022

It’s fair to be concerned about your children when you are facing a divorce. How are they going to cope with this transition? When is the best time to tell them? The truth of the matter is that your children may be as confused as you are when it comes to the next steps for the family. Here are a few ways to support your children as changes begin to happen in the home.

1. Be Honest: Your children should understand that you are getting divorced and what that means. It is important to explain within reason, making sure your explanation is age-appropriate and not drawn out or too detailed into the workings of your adult relationship. This is not the time for pointing fingers. It is important for you and your spouse to discuss how you want to tell your children about the upcoming divorce to make sure the message is consistent from both of you. Your goal is to be respectful and show that you and your partner can still be civil to each other in front of your children. You don’t want your children siding with one parent over the other. Your children may blame themselves, so it is important to reassure them that this isn’t their fault and that you still love them.

2. Be Consistent: Children operate best with structure and stability. Make sure you communicate with them how schedules may change and what they can expect moving forward. No changes in living arrangements should occur until after you tell them about the divorce. You want to establish routines with your children so they don’t feel like their world is falling apart. Parents need to be consistent with rules and guidelines for both homes, as well as consequences. Remember, your goal is to make sure that your children don’t favor one parent over the other, rather they enjoy the time they spend with both of you. It is important to be reliable and dependable for your children. Don’t make empty promises or commit to something that you can’t deliver on. If you say you are going to be there for them, don’t change plans. Every decision you and your partner make should be for your children’s physical, spiritual, and psychological health and well-being.

3. Be Validating: Your children need to know they can come to you to talk about what they are feeling. Provide them the space to process what they are going through. Try to focus on hearing them rather than trying to distract them from their feelings. While you may not be able to fix their problems or make their sadness go away, it is important to acknowledge their feelings rather than dismiss them. Your children may lash out at you or the other parent. It is important to be empathetic with your children’s anger, but to not allow them to express anger in a disrespectful way to you or the other parent.

2022-08-01T13:15:45-04:00August 1st, 2022|
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